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TUSKER GEOGRAFICA

Adventure Blog

OVER TWO DECADES OF ADVENTURE TRAVEL

  • Get to know Tusker's visionary founder - a sincere, passionate, and focused individual, with a pure love for experiencing the unknown.

  • At the moment Francois Langlois reached the summit of Everest, he made a promise to honor the gift of life.

  • Wine is a pleasure that has been enjoyed in various parts of the world for thousands of years. In Africa, the popularity of wine is increasing rapidly. Most wine lovers know that South Africa is a major world producer of wine, but many don’t know that other countries in

  • Not so long ago, conflicts between two people were often settled with a consensual fight known as a duel. Generally during a duel, the two people had matched deadly weapons, followed rules that were agreed upon in advance and were battling over a specific point of honor.

  • For centuries, the harems of the Middle and Far East have tantalized the western imagination. While there is some truth to the fact that harems were kept to entertain the sexual whims of powerful rulers, the intent and actual reality of harems goes far beyond that.

  • Can you imagine a world without merchants, where we are left to our own devices to acquire goods and services without middlemen? Sounds like a harsh place to be. Today, merchants are some of the most successful people in the world. Being a merchant is still a

  • Sand and dust storms are one of the most harrowing and dangerous phenomena known to the world. Each year, they leave people lost, disoriented and gasping for air. They can obscure the sun and reduce visibility to almost zero. They can obliterate roads in a matter of

  • The garbage situation in Africa is getting out of control.

  • Bathing as an ordinary, everyday activity? Think again. Whether in the saunas of Scandinavia or the steaming bathhouses of ancient Japan, bathing rituals vary from the profane to the sacred and all things in between.

  • Jet lag, or circadian dischronism, is one of the big drawbacks of modern day air travel and can result in a feeling that is way beyond tired.

  • In Gisèle Lalonde Mansfield’s wildest dreams, she had never imagined that she would climb Mt. Kilimanjaro, Africa’s tallest peak, as a 55-year old grandmother. But on October 3rd, 2007 she boarded a plane bound for Tanzania.

  • The relationship humans have with sweets is one of history’s greatest love affairs. It is a food that is synonymous with pleasure, and nowadays it has even been touted for its numerous health benefits.

  • Lake Chad was once one of the greatest and most dynamic wetlands in the world; today it pales in comparison. Due to irrigation usage, global warming, reduced rainfall, damming of inlet rivers and other human activity, the lake is shrinking; and could all but disappear in as few as

  • Embarking on a journey with Tusker to Mongolia provides travelers with an extremely rare opportunity to experience rarely seen rock art, as old as 12,000 years, that is extremely hard to locate.

  • The world is filled with a plethora of smells and your travels will bring your olfactory nerve into direct contact with the best and worst of them. Inhale the aromas of flowers, foods and scents that bring you pleasure; brace yourself for sewage, body odors and smells that will bring you

  • The women of Asia who have risen to success throughout history are some of the most fearless and strong women in all of history. Their steely will, juxtaposed with their delicate feminine nature, gave rise to the descriptive term “Iron Butterflies”.

  • Bird’s nest soup is one of the most coveted delicacies in all of Asia, commonly referred to as the “caviar of the East”. Folklore suggests that the swift bird’s saliva is the key to eternal life. Due to its rarity, a single bowl of it can cost upwards of

  • In a time when people are regularly living to the age of 100 and beyond, phrases like “110 is the new 100” are gaining popularity.

  • Birth wherever it occurs, has a long list of complex traditions. From culture to culture, and species to species, these rituals are elaborate, meaningful and poles apart. Regardless if the outcome is always the same, live birth still has the power to enrapture, transform and spellbind.

  • It should be the basic right of every human being to breathe clean air, eat nutritious food, and live without exposure to harmful chemicals and toxins.

  • Vital Spirit They are said to inspire lust, excite the senses, enhance potency and replenish the vital spirit. They run the gamut from simple, everyday foods and herbs to inspired potions and elixirs. And for thousands of years, people have been using them to “get in the mood”. The reason for seeking

  • Many people can’t stand going to the dentist. However from ancient Egyptians to forensic scientists, humans have always been aware of the usefulness of teeth and the importance of tooth health.

  • Sometimes it seems as if we have the world at our fingertips and there aren’t many more original travel dreams left to be had. So what exactly does the future of travel hold for us? The answer is, a lot. Big plans are in the works.

  • Unless you are a fearless woman, no need to read further. This is regarding a climb up Mt. Kilimanjaro for women only and men need not apply.

  • From the Sentinelese of the Andaman Islands in the Indian Ocean, to the “Tree House Tribe” of Papua New Guinea, the world still offers a few unknown cultural gems that have been hidden from even the most seasoned adventure travelers.

  • In the animal kingdom man and dog have enjoyed a long and cherished love affair. But man and rat? Not so much. However, thanks to some clever work being done by the giant African pouched rat, the animals’ soiled reputation might soon be due for an overhaul.

  • A highly accomplished artist with a penchant for world travel, Josh Schachter has photographed, traveled and worked in some of the world’s most exotic destinations including Botswana, Kenya, Malawi, Tanzania, India, and Nepal. Josh is a highly skilled and talented artist, but more than that he is using his

  • Illegal to name a pig Napoleon? Illegal to blow your nose on Saturdays? Can these seriously be laws? Yes indeed.

  • With nothing to keep her company in the Himalayan cave except for a flickering candle, Alexandra David Neel noticed that another day had passed. Isolated from civilization, here she was, a French woman living as an ascetic in a cave.

  • The history of garlic, also known as the “stinking rose”, is a wild and adventurous one. Over the last 4,000 years of human history, the potent bulb has been both cherished and despised. It has been thought of as a miracle cure and repellant to ward off everything

  • Sixteen years after apartheid, South Africa remains a country with vast problems. But this summer, as the host country for the 2010 FIFA World Cup, South Africa’s progress was broadcast for the entire world to see.

  • Incarceration without a trial. Rampant corruption among staff. Uncontrolled spread of deadly disease. Overcrowding of cells. Extreme scarcity of food. Welcome to the prisons of Africa.

  • The desire to look and feel good, and keep the body healthy, is no new phenomenon. From Greek weightlifters to Indian Sadhu’s, the desire to exercise has waxed and waned throughout all of human history.

  • The Slow Food movement began on the Spanish Steps in Rome in 1986 when groups of angry Italians, brandishing bowls of penne, protested the opening of a McDonald’s franchise near the historical monument.

  • When it comes to body size, what seems clear is that most cultures have a strong opinion, but few agree on the “ideal.”

  • There is a great demand amongst the art collectors and dealers of the world, both legitimate and criminal, to acquire authentic African art for profit and pleasure.

  • In the midst of sprawling human civilization, the rest of the animal kingdom often appears to have disappeared. But whether it is a lone coyote on the streets of Anaheim, or a family of raccoons passing through a swimming pool patio, creatures from the wild still live amongst us.

  • Time is not as straightforward as it seems. In fact, there are countless ways of understanding time, and many of the things that are important culturally, are often determined by a community’s unique understanding of time.

  • In 1997, former president Bill Clinton granted a wish to a 16-year old boy to meet him, through the Make-A-Wish Foundation. Eight years later that same boy, with his lymphoma in remission, summitted Mt. Kilimanjaro, and called Clinton from the top. Inspired by his young friend, Clinton recently announced that

  • Chris Bredt, a lawyer from Toronto, Canada, just finished his second climb up Kilimanjaro. Not only did he climb all the way to the summit of that massive mountain (twice!), but he also led a team that raised over $180,000 for charity on the most recent climb.

  • Earning the daily bread means one thing to Westerners but means something quite different to indigenous cultures.

  • Once, the ocean was thought to be inexhaustible—a limitless source of edible sea creatures. Now, many marine populations are plummeting, and perhaps no fish is currently in greater danger than the Atlantic bluefin tuna.

  • On March 1, 1896, Italian forces attempted to gain control of Ethiopia in the Battle of Adowa. The results from this conflict would mark the beginning of the end of European colonialism in Africa.

  • Like most other people in the world, Africans need a practical and cost effective way to get from point A to point B, and it is bicycles that have kept Africans on the move.

  • Throughout history, sexuality has been at the very heart of every culture. But from one culture to the next, moralities towards it differ greatly.

  • Tennis icon Martina Navratilova defied age to win major doubles championships after 40. Despite her renowned tenacity and training regime, summiting Kilimanjaro is not yet part of her legacy.

  • In November of 2010, Miin Alikhan, a hospital director from Toronto, Ontario, developed high altitude pulmonary edema during a Kilimanjaro climb and was subsequently evacuated during the night after her team had summited. Here is Miin’s first hand account of her time on the mountain.

  • Carnival, the annual rite of letting your alter ego out of the cage, has many faces, customs and costumes.

  • Every once in a long while, a person is born in this world that possess an unusual combination of altruism, ambition and guts.

  • If you live near a major city in the world, or these days even a smaller one, there is one thing you can’t avoid: traffic. Add road rage into the mix and you’ve got a highly combustible cocktail for a driving disaster.

  • In an age where independent films and global cinema are so readily available, it is well worth taking a look at the past and present of the African continent’s cinematic history.

  • In Sub-Saharan Africa, one in two people survive on less than $1 per day. However, there are also a number of African individuals with extreme wealth - even a few who have made Forbes World’s Billionaires list.

  • It’s nothing new; throughout human history, fermented beverages have been brewed for heady consumption.

  • In November 2012, Tusker Trail is heading to Australia for another exhilarating Total Solar Eclipse trip down-under!

  • As far as sacred mountains go, Borneo’s Mount Kinabalu ranks up there with Kilimanjaro, Everest and Denali. But unlike iconic peaks elsewhere that are reserved for fit hikers and mountaineers, Kinabalu is climbed by nearly everyone on Sabah, or at least they try. It’s as much a spiritual and mental

  • This year, Tusker's signature Mongolia Trek landed itself on Outside's esteemed hot list.

  • Board any commercial airliner these days and upon first inhale, you’ve filled up your lungs with the B.O. infused oxygen of several hundred passengers from the prior flight. In some instances, it gets to a point where a traveler is far too stinky to be around others and

  • Second only to drug trafficking, the smuggling of endangered animal species is a major, illegal international business.

  • These women call themselves the Asgarda and they are seeking nothing short of complete autonomy from men.

  • Most Americans have stopped traveling to Mata Ortiz, just 140 miles south of the border because of the drug war and it’s too bad. The once forgotten town has dusted off its prehistoric roots and has become synonymous with cutting edge 21st century pottery, creating a revolution in mud, not

  • In March, Gavin MacKenzie, a Canadian Lawyer and 9x Boston Marathoner, did a solo summit of Kilimanjaro with Kombe, his Tusker guide. During his climb, Gavin kept a detailed journal of his experience to share with family and friends. Gavin’s entry from his emotional summit day offers a rich description

  • Born out of extreme ethnic and economic tensions, Biafra was a creation that many countries refused to recognize. Though Biafra ceases to exist today, its story is a timely cautionary tale.

  • Tusker’s video “Kilimanjaro – A Lost World”, narrated by Will Lyman, recently exceeded the 100,000-view mark on YouTube.

  • Luanda, Tokyo and Geneva are very different places, but they have one thing in common. They are damn expensive.

  • An avid astrophotographer, one of Shawn Quinn’s main objectives was to photograph the southern skies with a DSLR on a tracking mount. Upon his return home, Quinn wrote a fascinating article about the expedition, which was published in Sky and Telescope magazine complete with his stunning photography.

  • Many European birds are known to use Africa as their winter home. But in recent years, numerous species have decided not to return to Europe after their stay, or return in far less numbers.

  • If the world is shrinking, consider what hasn’t changed in Chimayo, New Mexico.

  • The Aghori tribe in Northern India are self-proclaimed holy men – holy men who embrace some decidedly unholy things.

  • A few months ago, Lynn Anderson, stood on the summit of Kilimanjaro. To achieve the summit was a lifetime goal of hers, and at the age of 66, she was finally able to make her dream a reality. Upon her return home, Lynn wrote the following letter to Eddie Frank

  • Meet the first generation of African filmmakers who are not easily seduced by Hollywood. Their work is groundbreaking and their continued successes will help Africa emerge as a cinematic center.

  • Smoking dates back to the earliest known history of humankind, and the ritual and meaning of smoking is a most fascinating subject. Especially since old habits die hard; today we live in a world with 1.1 billion tobacco smokers.

  • In March 2011, Scott Stewart, President of Carlson Wagonlit Travel, climbed Kilimanjaro with three friends to raise money for their local hospital. Not only did the team summit successfully, they also blew their fundraising goal out of the water, raising over $100,000 which will be used to build a cancer

  • No matter where you live in the world, getting behind the wheel of a car and venturing out has its risks. But there are a few choice spots in the world where you can exponentially increase your chance of disaster and death on the road.

  • Dating can be hard enough as it is. When you’re stuck in a rut - frustrated by the options you have in your social circle, your town, or even your country - a foreign fling may be just the thing to jumpstart your romantic life.

  • Hayley Bushnell recently climbed Kilimanjaro for her 30th birthday. The climb was not only her first summit; it was also her first camping trip!

  • Considered to be one of the last true wilderness areas on Earth, Mongolia’s Altai Sayan Ecoregion touches the edges of Kazakstain and China. A region of unparalleled beauty, the Altai is also an archaeological treasure-box. Exquisite petroglyphs remain virtually undiscovered and provide a stunning pictorial record of prehistory. In 2012,

  • Leading glaciologists have declared that glaciers and ice fields are receding at an alarming rate, and for the most part, their findings are correct.

  • Poll any population on a prison yard and you’ll find nothing but innocent men. How can no one there be guilty of a crime? The answer lies … in a lie.

  • “I felt like I could handle anything in that moment. I was smiling so big my face hurt. I felt like laughing. I felt grace.” In May, Tusker coordinator Mariya Porten climbed Kilimanjaro with her father, Steve Porten. The climb affected Mariya in ways she never could have imagined, and

  • This is the second article in a 3-part series about Tusker Trail’s newest trip – Mongolia's Altai Mountains: Ancient Culture and Photography Workshop. The renowned Esther Jacobson-Tepfer is the cultural instructor for the upcoming workshop. Discover how Esther made her way from Boston to the petroglyph-studded steppes of Mongolia’s

  • Most cultures over the centuries have produced their own clown characters, performing almost identical functions as anarchic fools skilled in the art of pantomime, mimicry, and chaos. The need for a punch line, often at our own expense, is in our blood, and if the scientists are right, our blood

  • In much of the Western world, our notion of eating fruit consists of the conventional apples, oranges, and bananas. However, there is a whole world of exotic goodness out there, and many of our palettes have hardly scratched the surface.

  • This August, Maxine Adshead, a retiree from Cranbrook, British Colombia who is an avid hiker and black belt in karate, summited Kilimanjaro as a member of the annual Eddie & Amy Frank Climb. Read Maxine’s heartfelt letter to Tusker Coordinator, Mel Kaida, about the many special moments her team shared

  • The internal strife on the African continent has made it almost impossible to build a strong communication infrastructure. But things are starting to change. Multiple countries in Africa already have satellites in orbit, some used for disaster monitoring and tracking endangered species, such as gorillas.

  • This is the third article in a 3-part series about Tusker Trail’s newest trip – Mongolia's Altai Mountains: Ancient Culture and Photography Workshop. Gary Tepfer is the photo instructor for the upcoming workshop, and after three-decades in the field, Tepfer is eager to share his skills. Get ready for

  • Personal appearance is a big deal for many of us, and one of the defining factors of a person’s appearance is their hair. Having well-groomed hair is not a trend that is exclusive to modern civilization. For thousands of years, hair has played a highly important role in society.

  • Before Beth Behrle climbed Kilimanjaro in 2006, she promised her 12-year-old daughter Katie that they would climb it together some day. The climb would prove to be much more challenging than Beth had ever imagined. But 5 years later, Katie held her mom to the promise she had unwittingly made

  • Seen throughout history, maps ultimately tell stories about places, and the people who lived there. Always a representation of knowledge, and forever an instigator of adventure, maps trace the broad sweep of human history.

  • All is not well in the world of coral reefs in our oceans. The consensus among many scientists throughout the world seems to be that the future of coral reefs is an absolute nightmare.

  • Beauty has always been in the beholder’s eye, but it is also a window into a country’s psyche.

  • Forget everything you know about the bad boys of history. Guys like Robin Hood had nothing on Eustace the Black Monk.

  • The Hubble Space Telescope is a space-based observatory that has transformed astronomy, spirituality, and galvanized even the most casual stargazers among us.

  • While the government continues to plan the take-down of Rio’s dilapidated favelas, there are those who strive to bring dignity to the resilient residents through public art projects. After all, these neighborhoods have come to define the partial identity of the Brazilian nation over time.

  • This Kili trip began with Mark suggesting the base camp of Everest. Again I said no way. Mark came back with, "How about Kilimanjaro?"

  • Almost everyone loves a mystery. Dating back in literature almost 200 years, the form can be traced from obscure early 18th century German authors, to Edgar Allen Poe, to Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes, to the hardboiled Dashiel Hammett, all the way up to the fraying CSI franchise on TV.

  • For artists through the ages, death wasn’t something to wallow in, but the catalyst to create some of the planet’s most vibrant folk and fine art.

  • There is no pure water on our planet. Period. How does humanity secure access to the cleanest, most sustainably-sourced water?

  • One “lone wolf” bequeathed to us by history stands above the rest, at least in terms of sheer swagger and audacity. John Fairfax was the first human being to row solo across any ocean—the Atlantic, and he’s first to row across the Pacific, period.

  • Despite being the "golden" group member, Jim O'Brien regales over his Kilimanjaro climb, foggy summit and all.

  • They are some of the world’s cultural icons and richest ecosystems. Established in 1972 at a United Nations convention, today the list of World Heritage sites has ballooned to 936 in 153 countries. UNESCO has come under increasing pressure and criticism for its World Heritage campaign.

  • “Where do we come from? And where are we going?” The mystery of our being is a widely debated subject that never fails to fascinate. Perhaps reincarnation best describes the repetitive cycle of birth, death, and rebirth?

  • Sterling Rollins climbed Kilimanjaro with his family when he was 15 in 2010. Have a look at his eloquent account of the climb, written recently at age 17 for his English class.

  • Does foreign aid help or hurt Africa in the long run? Based on 50 years of foreign aid’s poor record, we think we know the answer.

  • Continuing to trailblaze in its approach to climbing Kilimanjaro, Tusker Trail has just entered into a groundbreaking (and mouth-watering) exclusive deal with the Culinary Institute of America.

  • While most nations with developed armed forces have Special Forces units, there are a few nations known for having units that could each arguably be called “the best of the best.” Take a look at some of the more elite forces around the globe.

  • Mount Kilimanjaro is both an iconic and clichéd part of Africa’s landscape. Artists have portrayed its massive snow-capped heights for a century and much of the work is not that artistic. Niles Nordquist and Aron Belka’s works emphasize the ephemeral beauty of the mountain.

  • The Ganges is the symbol of India, representing the country’s ancient civilization. Millions of people make pilgrimages to the river every year. However, the river, symbolizing the livelihood and religion of millions of Hindus, is threatened.

  • Democratizing and inescapable, altitude is the world’s Great Equalizer. It’s enough to make our Founding Fathers proud. The question is not who, but how much. And the higher you climb, the greater the effect.

  • I walked away feeling a great sense of accomplishment, not only because I reached the summit – but because I had fun doing it. I enjoyed every day and every moment on the mountain. I was inspired by its beauty, the strength of my teammates and the

  • At the height of Shanghai’s chaos in the early 1900s, one man entered the picture who would revolutionize self-defense and aid in turning the city around. His name was William Ewart Fairbairn, an English soldier.

  • Like an arrow in flight moving in only one direction, our bodies never get younger. “Time’s Arrow” has been shot, and is flying straight for a target it will never miss.

  • An elephant sculpted from barrels of an AK-47. A park bench designed from confiscated Glocks. Artists in gun-saturated parts of the world are transforming deadly weapons into works of art to make a statement and promote peace.

  • Located just over 1700 miles off the coast of South Africa, the island of Tristan da Cunha is the most remote inhabited island on Earth. For the bold adventurer, there are only a few locations left in the world as secluded and significant. Tusker Trail can take you there.

  • Inspired to hike Kilimanjaro in honor of fellow breast cancer survivors, Tusker trekker Donna Boehm reflects on what “Upkili for Breast Cancer” means to her.

  • The discovery of the Higgs boson, the holy grail of all quantum physics. The birth of a pure white albino bison, one of the rarest animals in the world. At first glance, these events may seem to have nothing in common. But with some perspective and a little imagination, they

  • Sex appeal is paramount in the lives of humans. Whether we realize it or not, we are all slaves to the biochemical odors, facial shapes and voice pitches of others.

  • The world’s biggest “landfill” isn’t even on land; it’s floating on a broad expanse of the northern Pacific Ocean. The Great Pacific Garbage Patch covers an area roughly the size of Africa and continues to grow.

  • From Sir H. Rider Haggard to Chinua Achebe, Africa-inspired literary lions have weaved a story as large as the continent.

  • In 1998, a bleaching event wiped out over 10 percent of the world’s coral reefs. Super reefs off Kenya’s coast have shown resistance to bleaching and may hold answers for reversing reef decline globally.

  • An ancient artifact, found among classic millennia-old Greek marble statues from 2,000 years ago, was built to calculate the positions of astronomical objects. Its discovery brought up more questions than it answered. The Antikythera Mechanism should not have been able to be built for another 14 centuries.

  • The bhut jolokia, or ghost pepper, is the hottest pepper in the world. One woman can rub its puree in her eyes without even a wince. Can you brave the heat?

  • From “The Odyssey” to “Robinson Crusoe”, stories of survival have seized the imagination for centuries. The idea of cheating death keeps us captivated and dares us to tread where our fears keep us from going.

  • They stand on Los Angeles street corners waiting for pickups to take them to construction jobs. They stand in the middle of Mexican intersections breathing fire hoping for a tip. They sit under the Nairobi sun selling toilets and fixing tires. They are workers in the world's biggest employment sector 

  • Just as in humans, mobility, energy, and psychology are all factors that affect animals that are missing limbs. The art and science of animal prosthetics has progressed to allow animals a range of motion and a degree of freedom that was never before possible.

  • The sea, once it casts its spell, holds one in its net of wonder forever. – Jacques Cousteau The final frontier of adventure may be space travel, but we have at least one frontier right here on Earth where relatively few people have ever ventured: the sea.

  • African wine connoisseurs are no longer concentrated only in South Africa. The popularity and production of wine is increasing rapidly throughout the continent.

  • Three environmental heroes toil quietly in Namibia, Brazil and India to save wildlife, but their innovative and daring ideas as well as their life experiences have been spread globally through TED.

  • Modern science didn’t come as far as it has simply by mixing chemicals in test tubes and injecting them into monkeys. The controversial tradition of self-experimentation has led to many breakthrough discoveries, but not without its often fatal risks.

  • In Kenya, 85 percent of the population has no electricity. Riots recently erupted in Pakistan over ten hour power cuts. India and China turn to often environmentally disastrous dams to feed their underpowered grids. The grid will likely not reach the remote corners of Mongolia or the vast rural plains of

  • Legendary female Samurai warrior Tomoe Gozen paved the way for the highly successful women of modern-day Japan. As beautiful as she was deadly, Tomoe was a woman not to be messed with.

  • Approaching midnight, on November 19, 2012, when Tusker founder Eddie Frank’s father, Mike, passed away peacefully at Eddie’s home, with Eddie and his wife Amy by his side – as they tell it, with a grin on his face – the world lost a true genius.

  • In a true testament to the indomitable spirit of dogs, man’s best friend saves a remote town in Alaska under siege by a deadly epidemic.

  • In 2011, Tusker's signature Mongolia Trek landed itself on Outside's esteemed hot list of top adventure trips. What distinguished it from hundreds of other contenders? Perhaps the breathtaking and remote landscape, spectacular biodiversity and cultural treasures had something to do with it. You’ll never look at the world the

  • In an age where man’s relationship with technology is paramount, our relationship with plants is unfortunately overlooked. In this age of global warming, there’s a good chance herbs and medicinal plants will keep you alive a lot longer than your computer.

  • A lost, unconscious child on the slopes of Kilimanjaro. A distressed hiker with a broken leg. Tusker guides to the rescue. In a letter to their trekking coordinator, Haley Brunello, Duane Lyons expresses his gratitude to the Tusker family.

  • On June 3, 1950, Maurice Herzog and Louis Lachenal summited Annapurna I, the first of the world’s fourteen 8,000 meter peaks to be climbed. Herzog’s account of the epic climb may have been one-sided, but his feat of reaching the impossible continues to resonate. As Herzog writes, “There are

  • In their shesh head wraps and long flowing bubus they are striking. When you add electric guitars, their on-stage presence is riveting. The rebellious sounds of legendary African rock musicians outlived the regimes that threatened them. You'll now find them at the center of the world music scene.

  • Two times to Uhuru just wasn't enough - Tanzania is calling him back. Mark Smith plans a grand farewell to Kilimanjaro via Tusker's Kili 360 Route.

  • Situated in the northwest corner of Iran, Lake Oroumieh is anything but ordinary. Faced with major environmental problems, Iran is poised to lose this natural wonder that has sustained civilizations and provided habitat to wildlife for centuries.

  • The Lyons family expresses their gratitude to Tusker Trail. Tusker Guides left a mighty impression by saving a lost, unconscious child, then rescuing an immobile climber.

  • The latest on the Tusker planet. 1. Tusker's latest Kilimanjaro route. The "Legacy" route. 2. View the upcoming solar eclipse from Kilimanjaro.

  • At precisely the same time as the Iranian Hostage Crisis, 3,000 miles away, Eddie Frank’s fledgling Tusker Trail was undergoing a little crisis of its own.

  • Conservation efforts are increasingly seen as a way to heal war torn nations. If wildlife can survive and rebound in war weary countries there is hope.

  • On the one year anniversary of her Kilimanjaro summit, Stacey Bieren reflects on the similarities between climbing a mountain and competing in the Special Olympics.

  • Located off the coast of Tanzania, Kilwa Kisiwani was once the most important urban center in the Indian Ocean. With its lofty ambitions, long run of success and an unparalleled allure, Kilwa Kisiwani was truly a city of power.

  • Niki Harry reflects on the trip of a lifetime. Delicious surprises and amazing people to top off a successful summit – not a bad way to celebrate a birthday!

  • Eating out of toilets; dining with the dead; waiters serving a life sentence. Restaurateurs find success in pushing the limits and testing your gag reflex.

  • The quest for vitality is as long running as humankind. From tobacco to khat, people around the world are chewing themselves awake.

  • The notorious Albanian Blood Feuds left many families without a male head of the household. Following strict moral codes, the eldest daughter chopped off her hair, swore virginity and took on the role.

  • When Mike Ramsden called wanting to do a fundraising climb for the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation, I signed up on the spot - as the guide. The CLIMB FOR THE CURE was a huge success; win-win is an understatement.

  • Inspired by her friend Sheila Robertson's Kilimanjaro climb, Johan reminds us, “Life is really worth living to the fullest.”

  • The question of what constitutes art is an everlasting debate. Whether it be a Tinga Tinga style painting or a Mongolian horse bridle, true art infects you with feelings.

  • After 1,600 kilometers of potholes, several near accidents and numerous Mexican army drug checkpoints, we were close to the U.S. border. And then things got interesting. (This is Part II of a three part series on international borders.)

  • Kilimanjaro, Hakuna Matata. Sharon Kaufman on the adventure of a lifetime.

  • Life in border towns is often driven by contrasts between countries straddling the line. To survive, you have to be street smart, fearless and perceptive.

  • Shah Jahan ruled the Mongol empire with a ruthless brand of justice and flagrant self-celebration. But his greatest monument would come to be inspired by something other than his delusions of grandeur; it would be inspired by love.

  • Grappling with the discovery of impossibly large skeletons and vastly oversized tools, researchers find themselves debating if giants existed beyond the realm of mythology.

  • That immortal line quoted in the title above found its way into Eddie's brain, out of his mouth, and into the annals of adventure as one of the - until now - least known epic comebacks ever.

  • It started with a record-breaking 1 mile run through the Detroit Airport. It ended as the best trip ever.